Category

Identity & Branding

Honest Advertising Slogans 8 - Maybelline

5 Honest But Funny Advertising Slogans – Part 8

By | Advertising, Identity & Branding, Logos

Advertising Slogans – Part 8 in a Series of 8.

We all know when we see certain brands out there in the world that we all have different viewpoints or reactions to them. Some reactions are good, while some are bad; but these 5 graphic representations of 5 well known brands and their advertising slogans, are purely comical in nature — if not true as well.

Honest Advertising Slogans 8 - Lay's

Honest Advertising Slogans 8 - Maybelline

Honest Advertising Slogans 8 - YouTube

Honest Advertising Slogans 8 - Kickstarter

Honest Advertising Slogans 8 - Louis Vitton

 

Always be sure your brand and image are in line with your business. Consult with The Creative Ninja today to ensure you’re sending the right message to your target market! Contact The Ninja to get started!

The Creative Ninja - Identity + Branding Ad

 

Honest Advertising Slogans 7 - Starbucks

5 Honest But Funny Advertising Slogans – Part 7

By | Advertising, Identity & Branding, Logos

Advertising Slogans – Part 7 in a Series of 8.

We all know when we see certain brands out there in the world that we all have different viewpoints or reactions to them. Some reactions are good, while some are bad; but these 5 graphic representations of 5 well known brands and their advertising slogans, are purely comical in nature — if not true as well.

Honest Advertising Slogans 7 - Starbucks

Honest Advertising Slogans 7 - Hallmark

Honest Advertising Slogans 7 - Old Spice

Honest Advertising Slogans 7 - Urban Outfitters

Honest Advertising Slogans 7 - Altoids

Always be sure your brand and image are in line with your business. Consult with The Creative Ninja today to ensure you’re sending the right message to your target market! Contact The Ninja to get started!

The Creative Ninja - Identity + Branding Ad

 

Honest Advertising Slogans - Harley Davidson

5 Honest But Funny Advertising Slogans – Part 6

By | Advertising, Identity & Branding, Logos

Advertising Slogans – Part 6 in a Series of 8.

We all know when we see certain brands out there in the world that we all have different viewpoints or reactions to them. Some reactions are good, while some are bad; but these 5 graphic representations of 5 well known brands and their advertising slogans, are purely comical in nature — if not true as well.

Honest Advertising Slogans - Harley Davidson

Honest Advertising Slogans - Gillette

Honest Advertising Slogans - WebMD

Honest Advertising Slogans - Wikipedia

Honest Advertising Slogans - Monopoly

 

Always be sure your brand and image are in line with your business. Consult with The Creative Ninja today to ensure you’re sending the right message to your target market! Contact The Ninja to get started!

The Creative Ninja - Identity + Branding Ad

 

The Creative Ninja - Identity + Branding Ad

Starting a Brand for Beginners

By | Identity & Branding, Logos, Marketing

What is a brand exactly? And how do you go about starting a brand for small business?

Mary Van de Wiel, from NY Brand Lab said it best when it comes to branding for small businesses;

“If you’re interested in business with customers, you’re going to want a brand because without it you lack identity, a pulse, a presence, and purpose.”

 

What is Branding?

Branding, put simply, is ‘the marketing practice of creating a name, symbol or design that identifies and differentiates a product from other products.’ (Branding, Entrepreneur.com).

But what else is branding? Branding differentiates you from your competitors. Branding is how you want your audience and everyone else to view your company. Branding is what your audience can expect from your services or products.

What Is Branding

How to Create a Brand

1. Define your brand

Before you about starting a brand, you must first define your brand. Clearly define the following to focus your brand:

  • Company mission statement.
  • Characteristics of your company.
  • Characteristics you would like your company to have.
  • Who is our target audience?
  • What are our company goals?

 

2. Create the Logo and Color Scheme

Color:

First let’s talk color schemes. Though this may not seem like a super important decision for your brand; let me assure you that it is. Why? The human mind is extremely responsive to visual stimuli, which most of us already know. However, colors play a major contributor in this response, which you may or may not have known.

Each and every color will affect your brand differently as there are underlying messages behind each. The shade and tone of your color will affect your brand as well.

Meanings associated with differing colors:

  • Pink: Feminine, Love, Tranquil
  • Red: Power, Passion
  • Orange: Health, Energy, Warmth, Excitement
  • Green: Nature, Soothing, Money
  • Blue: Peace, Loyal, Clean, Trust
  • Purple: Magic, Creativity, Royalty
  • White: Purity, Cleanliness, Simplicity
  • Black: Power, Sophistication
  • Brown: Rural, Outdoors, Masculine

 

The Logo

You need to take ample time when creating your logo with starting your brand, with a professional logo designer (like The Creative Ninja). Your company’s logo is a crucial piece in creating an effective brand. Think of your logo as your company’s identity. Your logo is what your audience will learn to associate with your company and its services or products. See what makes a good logo?

When creating your logo, think long term. A good question to as yourself is, ‘what logo would I like to see my company have in 10 years?’

You also want to determine how you are going to use your logo. Are you going to use it online, on billboards, stationary, vehicles, etc? You want to create a logo that is adaptable to each and every possible way you plan to use it.

 

3. Create a Tagline

What is a tagline? Simply put, a tagline is a unique phrase that links your name to your brand.

Taglines are tricky to come up with and more work that one might think. However, don’t get so focused on creating the perfect tagline that your hands start sweating, your temple vein starts pulsing at an alarming rate and you just can’t think or enjoy the process!

Do this instead… when starting your brand instead of focusing on what your product or service is that your brand represents, focus instead on the benefits of your services or products. This is what your tagline should ‘say’ to your audience.

Examples of great taglines:

  • Nike: “Just do it.”
  • LG: “Life’s Good”
  • Apple: “Think Different”
  • Lego: “Play on”
  • Walmart: “Save Money Live Better”
  • McDonalds: “I’m lovin it.”
  • L’Oreal: “Because you’re worth it.”
  • Disneyland: “The happiest place on earth.”

 

4. Integrate the ‘Brand’

Your brand is now ready to be integrated into every aspect of your company. Small businesses have a leg up in this area, because with fewer employees comes the opportunity of being more personable with your audience.

Proper training of your staff will ensure that when starting a brand, everyone is on the same page with the brand.  Why is this important? I’ll explain using the example of a cleaning services business. If the business is trying to portray their brand as being ‘professional’ and ‘clean’, then an employee who is wearing ‘dirty’ or ‘inappropriate’ clothing will confuse your audience.  Proper training of your employees will considerably help with any of these issues.

 

5. Be Consistent and Authentic

Lastly, but very importantly, make sure every communication you send out in regards to your company is consistent and in line with the brand you have created. A confusing brand will deter rather than attract your audience.

 

Conclusion

When starting a small business and starting a brand, branding is an essential part of creating a business. Follow the steps above to create a brand that envelops the essence of your company and reap the rewards that come along with it.

The Creative Ninja - Identity + Branding Ad

For help defining your small business identity and brand, contact The Ninja to get started–Together, we can build you the brand you want to attract the customers you want!

 

Honest Advertising Slogans - iTunes

5 Honest But Funny Advertising Slogans – Part 5

By | Advertising, Identity & Branding, Logos

Advertising Slogans – Part 5 in a Series of 8.

We all know when we see certain brands out there in the world that we all have different viewpoints or reactions to them. Some reactions are good, while some are bad; but these 5 graphic representations of 5 well known brands and their advertising slogans, are purely comical in nature — if not true as well.

Honest Advertising Slogans - Candy Crush Saga

Honest Advertising Slogans - Yellow Pages

Honest Advertising Slogans - Victoria's Secret

Honest Advertising Slogans - iTunes

Honest Advertising Slogans - Subway

Always be sure your brand and image are in line with your business. Consult with The Creative Ninja today to ensure you’re sending the right message to your target market! Contact The Ninja to get started!

The Creative Ninja - Identity + Branding Ad

Honest Advertising Slogans - Instagram

5 Honest But Funny Advertising Slogans – Part 4

By | Advertising, Identity & Branding, Logos

Advertising Slogans – Part 4 in a Series of 8.

We all know when we see certain brands out there in the world that we all have different viewpoints or reactions to them. Some reactions are good, while some are bad; but these 5 graphic representations of 5 well known brands and their advertising slogans, are purely comical in nature — if not true as well.

Honest Advertising Slogans - Men's Health

Honest Advertising Slogans - Pepsi

Honest Advertising Slogans - Instagram

Honest Advertising Slogans - LinkedIn

Honest Advertising Slogans - Cosmopolitan

Always be sure your brand and image are in line with your business. Consult with The Creative Ninja today to ensure you’re sending the right message to your target market! Contact The Ninja to get started!

The Creative Ninja - Identity + Branding Ad

Logo Colour Wheel

How Logo Colour Sends Messaging About Your Brand

By | Identity & Branding, Logos

If you are building a company that depends on making people feel sexy and sophisticated, it’s probably going to confuse your consumers if your logo colour is bright green.

That’s because different colors are associated with different feelings. Green conveys organic growth, the earth, nature, or feelings of caring. Meanwhile, black communicates feelings of sophistication, authority or seduction. Not convinced? Consider the green logo colour for Starbucks or Greenpeace and the black logo colours of Chanel or Sony.

Logo colour isn’t the only design element that communicates with your customer about your brand. Font, spacing between letters and shape also tell your brand story in that instant when a first impression is formed.

Have a look at the infographic below, to get a sense of whether your logo colour, shape and spacing are conveying the right message.

The Psychology Behind Logo Colours

 

What Different Colours Mean

Logo Colour Wheel

Every colour, has implications for logo design. Businesses need to pick their logo colours carefully to enhance specific elements of the logo and bring nuance to your message with the use of shade and tone.

In general terms, bright and bold colours are attention-grabbing but can appear brash. Muted tones convey a more sophisticated image, but run the risk of being overlooked. More specifically, particular meanings are ascribed to different colours in society…

  • Red implies passion, energy, danger or aggression; warmth and heat. It has also been found to stimulate appetite, which explains why it is used in so many restaurants and food product logos. Choosing red for your logo can make it feel more dynamic.
  • Orange is often see as the colour of innovation and modern thinking. It also carries connotations of youth, fun, affordability and approachability.
  • Yellow requires cautious use as it has some negative connotations including its signifying of cowardice and its use in warning signs. However it is sunny, warm and friendly and is another colour that is believed to stimulate appetite.
  • Green is commonly used when a company wishes to emphasise their natural and ethical credentials, especially with such products as organic and vegetarian foods. Other meanings ascribed to it include growth and freshness, and it’s popular with financial products too.
  • Blue is one of the most widely used colours in corporate logos. It implies professionalism, serious mindedness, integrity, sincerity and calm. Blue is also associated with authority and success, and for this reason is popular with both financial institutions and government bodies. Purple speaks to us of royalty and luxury. It has long been associated with the church, implying wisdom and dignity, and throughout history it has been the colour of wealth and riches.
  • Black is a colour with a split personality. On the one hand it implies power and sophistication, but on the other hand it is associated with villainy and death. More mundanely, most logos will need a black and white version for use in media in which colour is not available – and there is currently a trend for bold monochrome logos and word marks.
  • White is generally associated with purity, cleanliness, simplicity and naiveté. In practical terms, a white logo will always need to stand in a coloured field to make it show up on a white background. Many companies will choose to have a coloured version and a white version of their logos; for example, the Coca-Cola word mark appears in white on its red tins and brown bottles but is used in red when needed on a white background.
  • Brown has masculine connotations and is often used for products associated with rural life and the outdoors.
  • Pink can be fun and flirty, but its feminine associations means it is often avoided for products not specifically targeted at women.

These associations are not rigid rules, of course, but they’re worth keeping in mind as you make your colour choices. Remember that the overall impact of your logo design will depend not on the colours themselves but upon how these interact with the shapes and text.

 

Single or multiple colours?

Logo Colour - ebay

Multiple colours are difficult to pull off, but can work.

To get the maximum impact of your chosen colour’s coded message, I normally stick with a single colour when creating a logo design. That said, there are some very successful multi-coloured logos – think of Google, Windows or eBay.

The implication of multiple colours is that these companies are offering a wide choice of products and services. The multiple colours used for the Olympic rings carry a message of diversity and inclusivity.

A newly emergent trend in logo design is the use of mosaic patterns and tessellation. These naturally require several colours, ranging from contrasting brights to multiple shades of a single colour.

 

Think globally

If your client is a global corporation, choose your logo colour with care. There are cultural differences in the way colours are interpreted. For example, red is considered lucky in China, while white is the colour of death and mourning in India. There’s a good round up of the cultural connotations of different colours here.

Finally, don’t put too much focus on colour choice. Consider that one in 12 of us suffer from colour blindness. Plus there’s always the likelihood that any logo you produce for a client will end up be reproduced in monochrome, or even in different colours, as they see fit. So make sure your logo colour choice reinforces and enhances the design of your logo – but doesn’t define it.

The Creative Ninja - Identity + Branding Ad

Honest Advertising Slogans - Nike

5 Honest But Funny Advertising Slogans – Part 3

By | Advertising, Identity & Branding, Logos

Advertising Slogans – Part 3 in a Series of 8.

We all know when we see certain brands out there in the world that we all have different viewpoints or reactions to them. Some reactions are good, while some are bad; but these 5 graphic representations of 5 well known brands and their advertising slogans, are purely comical in nature — if not true as well.

Honest Advertising Slogans - Toyota

Honest Advertising Slogans - Nike

Honest Advertising Slogans - Adobe Acrobat

Honest Advertising Slogans - Lego

Honest Advertising Slogans - FedEx

 

Always be sure your brand and image are in line with your business. Consult with The Creative Ninja today to ensure you’re sending the right message to your target market! Contact The Ninja to get started!

The Creative Ninja - Identity + Branding Ad

Advertising Slogans - Best Buy

5 Honest But Funny Advertising Slogans – Part 2

By | Advertising, Identity & Branding, Logos

Advertising Slogans – Part 2 in a Series of 8.

We all know when we see certain brands out there in the world that we all have different viewpoints or reactions to them. Some reactions are good, while some are bad; but these 5 graphic representations of 5 well known brands and their advertising slogans, are purely comical in nature — if not true as well.

Advertising Slogans - Hummer

Advertising Slogans - The Onion

Advertising Slogans - McDonalds

Advertising Slogans - Best Buy

Advertising Slogans - Apple

Always be sure your brand and image are in line with your business. Consult with The Creative Ninja today to ensure you’re sending the right message to your target market! Contact The Ninja to get started!

Advertising Slogans - tinder

5 Honest But Funny Advertising Slogans – Part 1

By | Advertising, Identity & Branding, Logos

Advertising Slogans – Part 1 in a Series of 8.

We all know when we see certain brands out there in the world that we all have different viewpoints or reactions to them. Some reactions are good, while some are bad; but these 5 graphic representations of 5 well known brands and their advertising slogans, are purely comical in nature — if not true as well.

honest-advertising-slogans-36

honest-advertising-slogans-37

honest-advertising-slogans-38

honest-advertising-slogans-39

honest-advertising-slogans-40

Always be sure your brand and image are in line with your business. Consult with The Creative Ninja today to ensure you’re sending the right message to your target market! Contact The Ninja to get started!

Unilever

20 Well Designed Logos

By | Communications Design, Identity & Branding, Logos

Well designed logos can be tricky.

On one hand, you want something which is instantly recognisable and engaging with the audience. But on the other hand, having a boring, straightforward logo can get tiresome. Well designed logos will communicate more about a business than just being a mark to represent you.

People can quickly figure out the gist of a basic logo, and they get bored of it. You need something which is going to encourage people to take another look at the logo – something deeper than just the surface meaning. This could be taking advantage of negative space, or simply playing with text to create images.

A hidden message in a logo is the best way to do that. Here are 20 great examples.

 

Unilever

Unilever Logo

Unilever is an enormous company, with several subdivisions focusing on various elements of their business. Their logo redesign tried to take this into consideration, incorporating symbolic doodles of everything they do into their large “U” branding. It’s smart, and has won plaudits.

 

Presbyterian Church

Presbyterian Church Logo

Okay, so you see the cross here. But do you see the rest? There’s a bible on a pulpit; a clerical robe; fish on either side; a dove; and flames. This works on lots of levels.

 

Yoga Australia

Yoga Australia Logo

So far, so boring. But the negative space in the yoga woman’s leg is the map of Australia.

 

Northwest AirlinesNorthwest Airlines

This logo should never have been scrapped. You can see all the different components.

 

Carrefour

Carre Four Logo

Those who don’t know their French ought to be told that “carrefour” means crossroads. You get the arrows, plus the “C” in the negative space.

 

Piano Forest

Piano Forest

Trees, right? Well the monochromatic logo also shows a hint of a piano keyboard.

 

The Guild of Food Writers

The Guild of Food Writers Logo

You think you’ve got this one licked, right? A pen – that’s the writing bit. But look inside the nib of the pen. There’s a spoon.

 

Museum of London

Museum of London Logo

London’s an ever-growing city, as demonstrated by the ever increasing blotches in the background of this. It works on many levels.

 

Schizophrenic

Schizophrenic Logo

Schizophrenia is a bipolar personality disorder. This logo represents both the happy and sad times.

 

Big 10 Conference

Big Ten Conference Logo

The Big 10 conference has 11 members. Problem? No. Check out the negative space.

 

Toblerone

Toblerone Logo

Delicious European candy. What’s the deal with the logo, though? There’s the mountain, which represents where the chocolate was originally made. Then spot the bear inside it – which were plentiful in the area!

 

Milwaukee Brewers

Milwaukee Brewers Logo

It’s a simple logo, right? The baseball mit – that’s it. Well, that’s wrong. You can spy the “M” and “B” in the mit, if you look a little closer.

 

Elle Hive Tractors

Elle Hive Tractors Logo

Again, playing with letters, this logo shows the “E” and the “H”, but also demonstrates a lo-fi tractor.

 

Sun Microsystems

Sun Microsystems Logo

This is one of the most famous examples of the genre. You can read “Sun” whichever way you look at it.

 

FedEx

FedEx Logo

But if you thought Sun’s was famous, FedEx is the example everyone cites when talking about hidden message logos. The arrow represents the speed and directness of their deliveries.

 

Amazon

Amazon Logo

Amazon stock everything, from A to Z, and do it with a smile. Thus the hidden messages in their logo.

 

AG Low Construction

AG Low Construction Logo

Construction companies rely on floor plans. But look a little closer. That spindly outline spells out the name of the company.

 

Baskin Robbins

Baskin Robbins Log

Baskin Robbins pride themselves on their 31 flavors of ice cream, which is what you can see in the pink text.

 

Formula 1

Formula 1 Logo

Formula 1 is speedy motor racing, which hasn’t caught on in the US that much. But their logo is universally recognised, and for good reason. The red flares demonstrate the speed – but take a look in the negative space. There’s the “1″ to go alongside the “F”.

 

Egg & Spoon

Egg & Spoon Logo

I’ll admit this took me a lot of work to understand. You see, I thought this was a boring, basic logo at first. It’s just a lower case E, isn’t it? But then you look closer – and the white space (again) looks like an egg in a spoon.

 

If you’re looking to create or refresh a logo for your business to better represent your brand, get in touch with The Creative Ninja by filling out the contact form. There are logo packages available for any budget; just request a free quote.

Google's Look Evolved

Google’s Look Evolved

By | Identity & Branding, Logos

Google has changed a lot over the past 17 years—from the range of our products to the evolution of their look and feel. And today they’re changing things up once again:

So why are they doing this now? Once upon a time, Google was one destination that you reached from one device: a desktop PC. These days, people interact with Google products across many different platforms, apps and devices—sometimes all in a single day. You expect Google to help you whenever and wherever you need it, whether it’s on your mobile phone, TV, watch, the dashboard in your car, and yes, even a desktop!

Today they’re introducing a new logo and identity family that reflects this reality and shows you when the Google magic is working for you, even on the tiniest screens. As you’ll see, they’ve taken the Google logo and branding, which were originally built for a single desktop browser page, and updated them for a world of seamless computing across an endless number of devices and different kinds of inputs (such as tap, type and talk).

It doesn’t simply tell you that you’re using Google, but also shows you how Google is working for you. For exaple, new elements like a colorful Google mic help you identify and interact with Google whether you’re talking, tapping or typing. Meanwhile, they’re bidding adieu to the little blue “g” icon and replacing it with a four-color “G” that matches the logo.

This isn’t the first time they’ve changed their look and it probably won’t be the last, but Google thinks today’s update is a great reflection of all the ways Google works for you across Search, Maps, Gmail, Chrome and many others. They think they’ve taken the best of Google (simple, uncluttered, colorful, friendly), and recast it not just for the Google of today, but for the Google of the future.

You’ll see the new design roll out across their products soon. Hope you enjoy it!