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The Creative Ninja

Honest Advertising Slogans 8 - Maybelline

5 Honest But Funny Advertising Slogans – Part 8

By | Advertising, Identity & Branding, Logos

Advertising Slogans – Part 8 in a Series of 8.

We all know when we see certain brands out there in the world that we all have different viewpoints or reactions to them. Some reactions are good, while some are bad; but these 5 graphic representations of 5 well known brands and their advertising slogans, are purely comical in nature — if not true as well.

Honest Advertising Slogans 8 - Lay's

Honest Advertising Slogans 8 - Maybelline

Honest Advertising Slogans 8 - YouTube

Honest Advertising Slogans 8 - Kickstarter

Honest Advertising Slogans 8 - Louis Vitton

 

Always be sure your brand and image are in line with your business. Consult with The Creative Ninja today to ensure you’re sending the right message to your target market! Contact The Ninja to get started!

The Creative Ninja - Identity + Branding Ad

 

Honest Advertising Slogans 7 - Starbucks

5 Honest But Funny Advertising Slogans – Part 7

By | Advertising, Identity & Branding, Logos

Advertising Slogans – Part 7 in a Series of 8.

We all know when we see certain brands out there in the world that we all have different viewpoints or reactions to them. Some reactions are good, while some are bad; but these 5 graphic representations of 5 well known brands and their advertising slogans, are purely comical in nature — if not true as well.

Honest Advertising Slogans 7 - Starbucks

Honest Advertising Slogans 7 - Hallmark

Honest Advertising Slogans 7 - Old Spice

Honest Advertising Slogans 7 - Urban Outfitters

Honest Advertising Slogans 7 - Altoids

Always be sure your brand and image are in line with your business. Consult with The Creative Ninja today to ensure you’re sending the right message to your target market! Contact The Ninja to get started!

The Creative Ninja - Identity + Branding Ad

 

Website Launch Checklist

A Website Launch Checklist: Are You Ready?

By | Blog, Communications Design, Websites

I know you’re excited to launch. But before you go live, make sure you’ve covered all your bases with this website launch checklist.

Website Launch Checklist

You’ve done it! You’ve finally finished that website you’ve been working on for days/weeks/months and you’re ready to share it with the world. But don’t hit that publish button before going through this website launch checklist first.

Even though nothing would make you happier than to get your site out there, you owe it to yourself (and your site) to check (and maybe double check) this 4-part website launch checklist.

Design checklist

It’s all too easy to miss (or break) something during the many back-and-forths, client feedback sessions, and other design iterations you go through. So going back to check for any design mistakes is vital.

This first checklist is completely visual—focused on whether the site looks good. We’ll go into functionality testing in the next step.

Cross-browser functionality

Different browsers may render your website in different ways, so it’s important to test your site in different browsers. Take a look at W3’s browser stats to see where you should focus your testing. (Though if you’re working on a redesign, browser-usage stats will be more useful.)

During this process (and the next, in multi-device testing) you’ll want to make sure your layouts, typography, navigation, and other design elements are displaying properly.

I always check:

  • Fonts
  • Colors/gradients
  • Images
  • Logo

Cross-device functionality

Make sure your site looks and performs beautifully on any device.

There have never been more web-capable devices around, and with that comes a staggering array of screen sizes. Done right, your site should perform well on any screen size, but be sure to double check. (You are a perfectionist after all, right?)

This is also where mobile navigation is crucial. Be sure to test out the user’s ability to navigate around the website on a touchscreen device, and make sure nothing gets lost in device transition.

In Webflow, we make it easy for you to test the most popular devices and preview your website on almost any size, streamlining the process of cross-device testing all in one place.

Image optimization

Images and graphics are an important element of many websites, so you’ll want to make sure they display properly, especially on all those ultra-high-definition devices (like Apple’s Retina screens) out there.

The rule of thumb is to upload your image at twice the size it’ll display on your site. In some cases, you can upload two images: an actual-size version for lower-res devices, and another that’s twice the size for high-res devices.

Why? Because the heavier the image, the slower your page will load, and the worse your user experience will be (which also negatively affects SEO, which we’ll cover later on).

 

Functionality testing

Design and functionality go hand in hand, but I like to isolate the two to make sure the website both looks the way it was designed to and that it performs as intended during my website launch checklist analysis.

Integration testing

This one is super important, and can range from a quick task to a giant one, depending on how many integrations you have. Typically, I’ll create a list of integrations as I add them so I don’t forget later on.

Some common integrations to test might be:

  • Web forms (check that the forms work and that submitted information goes to the right place)
  • Autoresponders
  • Marketing emails (MailChimp, Constant Contact, HubSpot, drip campaigns, etc.)
  • RSS feeds
  • eCommerce
  • CRM
  • CMS

Link testing

This one can be a doozy, simply because most sites have dozens (if not hundreds) of links. More often than not, there’s a link or two that goes nowhere, and it’s important to find them before your end-users do.

Some of the most important links to check are:

  • Top navigation links
  • Footer links
  • Social media links (Facebook, Twitter, etc.)
  • Logo (typically links to the home page)

Rather than doing all this manually, I’d suggest trying a link crawler like the W3C Link Checker, the Chrome plugin Check My Links, or Screaming Frog (which is excellent for SEO audits, too).

 

Content editing

Give the king its due.

Content is king, and the testing process should be fit for one. Typically this involves making sure that all content has been updated and approved. I can’t tell you how many websites I’ve found that still have a ‘Lorem Ipsum’ paragraph somewhere.

Now, if you practice content-first design, you should have final content already in place, so you can focus on more fine-toothed-comb review, like proofing for spelling and grammatical errors.

It’s also important to note here that it’s okay for content to be changed later on. Clients, team members, or you can always adjust text through a CMS. The main goal here is to ensure that your website content isn’t complete gibberish.

 

Search engine optimization (SEO)

Analyzing and optimizing your website after publishing is a never-ending process. And you need to consider semantic site structure from the get-go. But that doesn’t mean you won’t benefit from an SEO review before you hit publish.

There are multiple things that can be done to optimize your website for search engines.

1. Use proper semantic structure

Web crawlers (like Google’s bots) read through your website to get an understanding of your content, so that search engines know to display your website when people search for it. To help them crawl your site, you need to use language they’ll understand.

Historically, this has meant using the following semantic tags:

  • h1–h6 (heading tags)
  • p (paragraph tags)
  • ul/ol (unordered and ordered Lists)

You can also go above and beyond with some new HTML5 semantic tags:

  • <article>
  • <aside>
  • <details>
  • <figcaption>
  • <figure>
  • <footer>
  • <header>
  • <main>
  • <mark>
  • <nav>
  • <section>
  • <summary>
  • <time>

These tags are important because they let you identify the content that’s most relevant to users. In short: making it easy for search engines makes it easier for users to find you.

2. Meta SEO tags

Aside from on-page structure, you can also help web crawlers understand your site by titling and describing your pages as a whole.

Meta title

Your page’s meta title translates to the linked text people will see on search engine result pages (SERPs). It also displays on the browser tab when people click through to your page. Some best practices include:

  • Define the page’s central topic
  • Keep it under 70 characters in length (including spaces)
  • Use relevant keywords
  • Put important keywords in the front of the title

Meta description

The meta description is a short sentence (or two) that describes what your website has to offer. It will (sometimes) show up below your meta title in search results.

Some best practices include:

  • Include keywords that describe the page
  • Don’t go over 160 characters
  • Write your description for people, not robots. (Google doesn’t use descriptions in web rankings).

3. Open Graph settings

Social media has become a key element of SEO, so it’s crucial that you amplify this process by providing effective Open Graph information. Open Graph settings include three pieces of content: title, description, and an image.

The title and description follow the same rules as their SEO counterparts, but instead of showing up in search results, they appear as the default title and description on social media platforms when shared.

This is hugely beneficial because it lets you determine what the messaging (and image) will be when others share your website, helping you keep control of your brand.

 

Analytics

Website analytics are another crucial piece to set up before you launch. It’s free to set up a Google Analytics account, and incredibly easy to integrate Google Analytics with Webflow.

Once set up, you’ll be able to track visitors and user engagement on your website almost instantly!

Bookmark this checklist and refer to it during your next website upgrade/re-design. Should you have any questions or want to reach out to The Ninja to partner with him for your next website project; contact him directly.

 

The Creative Ninja - Responsive Web Design Ad

Honest Advertising Slogans - Harley Davidson

5 Honest But Funny Advertising Slogans – Part 6

By | Advertising, Identity & Branding, Logos

Advertising Slogans – Part 6 in a Series of 8.

We all know when we see certain brands out there in the world that we all have different viewpoints or reactions to them. Some reactions are good, while some are bad; but these 5 graphic representations of 5 well known brands and their advertising slogans, are purely comical in nature — if not true as well.

Honest Advertising Slogans - Harley Davidson

Honest Advertising Slogans - Gillette

Honest Advertising Slogans - WebMD

Honest Advertising Slogans - Wikipedia

Honest Advertising Slogans - Monopoly

 

Always be sure your brand and image are in line with your business. Consult with The Creative Ninja today to ensure you’re sending the right message to your target market! Contact The Ninja to get started!

The Creative Ninja - Identity + Branding Ad

 

The Creative Ninja's Success!

The Creative Ninja Is Expanding To Serve You Better

By | Latest News

 

The Creative Ninja Is Expanding! Thank You!

QUICK SUMMARY OF THE PROGRAM EXPANDING THE CREATIVE NINJA

On January 29, 2016 The Creative Ninja and I were officially accepted into a program known as the BITS (Business In The Streets) Bootcamp with the purpose of expanding my business knowledge and to potentially obtain a hybrid loan/grant being offered to successful graduates of the program. Of 16 accepted applicants, 11 were enrolled into the program.

The program held 7 Group Sessions on Saturdays from 11:00 AM – 2:00 PM from February 6 – March 19. 2016 covering topics ranging from:

  • Business Plan & Model
  • Market Research
  • Marketing & Advertising
  • Financial Planning for Business
  • Operations Plan
  • Legal Advice …and more.

Each participant was also assigned a business mentor with a requirement to meet with them outside of the program hours on Saturday’s to assist them in their weekly business tasks and offer assistance with questions and how to proceed.

The BITS program participants whittled down in numbers during the operating weeks and were left with 6 graduates including myself and my business The Creative Ninja.

Each graduating program participant walked away with a better understanding of their business and a completed business plan to be submitted along with a presentation to a loan/grant review committee to pitch for the money to start or expand their business on March 24, 2016.

With a successful presentation on March 24, 2016, The Creative Ninja and I submitted our materials to apply for the funding. On April 27, 2016 I received a call from the BITS Program Manager, Veronika Kvon to notify me that I had been unanimously approved from the Loan/Grant Review Committee for the funding. I literally hung-up that call and did a happy dance in my home office.

I was successful in obtaining my first outside funding and can now focus on expanding my marketing and putting some proper systems in place to handle my growing client base.

 

PERSONAL EXPERIENCE FROM THE BITS PROGRAM

When I first applied for the BITS Program I had mixed feelings as I had been through a few other entrepreneurial programs previously that didn’t really focus a lot on my own business idea; but rather a “cookie cutter” model that generically put your idea to paper (they shall remain nameless). I assumed BITS would also resemble the same model but I decided to apply as after speaking with Veronika (BITS Program Manager) during the application process, it just felt different (and the lure of having a business mentor and acquiring funding to finally expand my business helped a bit too).

The. Experience. Blew. Me. away. Unlike the other cookie cutter programs, BITS delved right into my ideas and actually understood what I was trying to accomplish. Each session gave me more insight into how to apply our presenter’s information to my own business. They genuinely cared to help me succeed and kept reinforcing that concept throughout the program – always offering help whether in the group sessions or one-on-one. Having access to the combined business knowledge and support of my program peers, the mentors, my assigned mentor and the program staff really gave me a sense of community and family that wanted me to accomplish something and succeed.

At the graduation we were able to meet Mark Simpson, Founder and Chair of BITS as well as the panel of decision makers and people involved in supporting the program, which was really amazing. Everyone reinforced the idea of an eco-system and a family to support the graduates and that really is something amazing vs traditional program methodology. It’s not a handshake and you’re done with BITS; you become a close part of the BITS family and network, and that relationship I am very grateful for.

“I would recommend this program to anyone looking to get into entrepreneurship, or like myself, expand their business with fresh ideas with real support to tackle their small business ideas”.

 

SOME INFORMATION ABOUT BITS

You can find the story of BITS, its gatekeepers and everything that they do on their website.

Written By: Matthew Young, CEO & Creative Director, The Creative Ninja

 

The BITS Program receives funding for its program and financing opportunities through the City of Toronto in partnership with AlternaSavings’ Community Micro Finance Program, The Ontario Trillium Foundation, The Robert Kerr Foundation and Private Donors.

The Creative Ninja Thanks His Supporters for the Opportunity to be Expanding His Business!

The Creative Ninja - Marketing Ad

Tips for Creating Proper Facebook Carousel Ads

Tips for Creating Proper Facebook Carousel Ads

By | Advertising

Tips for Creating Proper Facebook Carousel Ads

Whether you’re in finance or the auto industry, gaming or ecommerce, the Facebook carousel ads format can help you connect with your audience and accomplish your goals.

With room for up to five images and videos in a single ad, the carousel format is available on Facebook, Instagram and the Audience Network and gives you a larger canvas to tell your story and show your products.

Since Facebook launched the carousel format last year, businesses have been using the Facebook carousel ads format to accomplish a variety of goals. Lands’ End used carousel ads to increase online sales and attract new summer shoppers, boosting total sales by 4.4% in less than a month. Direct Energy used carousel ads to build product and service awareness, increasing engagement 2.5X over previous link ad campaigns.

Here I’ve compiled creative guidelines for designing the best Facebook carousel ads for your goal. Read on before creating your first or next carousel ad.

Tell a story with your facebook carousel ads

Showing products is one way to use the carousel format, but that’s just the beginning. What if you developed a narrative through each sequential image? How about linking images together in a panorama to share a bigger story? You could zoom into specific product features on each image, or you could offer multiple views of the product. One image could hide something revealed in the next. The possibilities are endless, so tell the story that works best for your brand.

Tips for Creating Proper Facebook Carousel Ads

 

Use thumb-stopping creative

The main image or video can be the first thing your audience sees. Capture their attention by using imagery that has a strong focal point, is well art-directed, use depth of space, is thoughtfully composed, and most importantly, evokes an emotional response. Choose something that will make people remember you and act.

Tips for Creating Proper Facebook Carousel Ads

 

Imply continuation

Capturing your audience’s attention is the first step, getting them to swipe through the rest of the carousel format is the next. Create a “need-to-complete” feeling with your imagery. For example, your first image or video can tease your second, or it can suggest that the narrative continues throughout each tile.

Tips for Creating Proper Facebook Carousel Ads

 

Develop creative consistency

A visual thread is key. If the creative feels disjointed, it detracts from your story. Make sure that every image within the carousel format has a similar visual style, including lighting, colors and composition.

Tips for Creating Proper Facebook Carousel Ads

 

Don’t forget the copy

While imagery tends to be what captures attention first, don’t underestimate the value of language. Copy can be used to imply the continuation that makes people want to swipe or click. Make sure your copy matches your brand’s tone, and experiment to see what works best for your business.

Demonstrate brand identity

To be remembered, your creative should incorporate your brand. For more established brands, this can come across subtly in the visual execution of the ad. If you’re creating an ad for a lesser known brands, consider making your brand identity more explicit. The final frame is often the destination of choice to showcase brand, however that’s not the only way. Consider incorporating your brand earlier in the carousel format or across all of your creative.

Tips for Creating Proper Facebook Carousel Ads

Get people to act from your Facebook carousel ads with a call-to-action

For campaigns with a direct response objective, include a prominent call-to-action. Keep it short and make sure it connects with your campaign, not just the individual image or video. On Facebook, you can use a different caption with each image or video. Make them strong.

 

The Creative Ninja - Marketing Strategy

The Creative Ninja - Identity + Branding Ad

Starting a Brand for Beginners

By | Identity & Branding, Logos, Marketing

What is a brand exactly? And how do you go about starting a brand for small business?

Mary Van de Wiel, from NY Brand Lab said it best when it comes to branding for small businesses;

“If you’re interested in business with customers, you’re going to want a brand because without it you lack identity, a pulse, a presence, and purpose.”

 

What is Branding?

Branding, put simply, is ‘the marketing practice of creating a name, symbol or design that identifies and differentiates a product from other products.’ (Branding, Entrepreneur.com).

But what else is branding? Branding differentiates you from your competitors. Branding is how you want your audience and everyone else to view your company. Branding is what your audience can expect from your services or products.

What Is Branding

How to Create a Brand

1. Define your brand

Before you about starting a brand, you must first define your brand. Clearly define the following to focus your brand:

  • Company mission statement.
  • Characteristics of your company.
  • Characteristics you would like your company to have.
  • Who is our target audience?
  • What are our company goals?

 

2. Create the Logo and Color Scheme

Color:

First let’s talk color schemes. Though this may not seem like a super important decision for your brand; let me assure you that it is. Why? The human mind is extremely responsive to visual stimuli, which most of us already know. However, colors play a major contributor in this response, which you may or may not have known.

Each and every color will affect your brand differently as there are underlying messages behind each. The shade and tone of your color will affect your brand as well.

Meanings associated with differing colors:

  • Pink: Feminine, Love, Tranquil
  • Red: Power, Passion
  • Orange: Health, Energy, Warmth, Excitement
  • Green: Nature, Soothing, Money
  • Blue: Peace, Loyal, Clean, Trust
  • Purple: Magic, Creativity, Royalty
  • White: Purity, Cleanliness, Simplicity
  • Black: Power, Sophistication
  • Brown: Rural, Outdoors, Masculine

 

The Logo

You need to take ample time when creating your logo with starting your brand, with a professional logo designer (like The Creative Ninja). Your company’s logo is a crucial piece in creating an effective brand. Think of your logo as your company’s identity. Your logo is what your audience will learn to associate with your company and its services or products. See what makes a good logo?

When creating your logo, think long term. A good question to as yourself is, ‘what logo would I like to see my company have in 10 years?’

You also want to determine how you are going to use your logo. Are you going to use it online, on billboards, stationary, vehicles, etc? You want to create a logo that is adaptable to each and every possible way you plan to use it.

 

3. Create a Tagline

What is a tagline? Simply put, a tagline is a unique phrase that links your name to your brand.

Taglines are tricky to come up with and more work that one might think. However, don’t get so focused on creating the perfect tagline that your hands start sweating, your temple vein starts pulsing at an alarming rate and you just can’t think or enjoy the process!

Do this instead… when starting your brand instead of focusing on what your product or service is that your brand represents, focus instead on the benefits of your services or products. This is what your tagline should ‘say’ to your audience.

Examples of great taglines:

  • Nike: “Just do it.”
  • LG: “Life’s Good”
  • Apple: “Think Different”
  • Lego: “Play on”
  • Walmart: “Save Money Live Better”
  • McDonalds: “I’m lovin it.”
  • L’Oreal: “Because you’re worth it.”
  • Disneyland: “The happiest place on earth.”

 

4. Integrate the ‘Brand’

Your brand is now ready to be integrated into every aspect of your company. Small businesses have a leg up in this area, because with fewer employees comes the opportunity of being more personable with your audience.

Proper training of your staff will ensure that when starting a brand, everyone is on the same page with the brand.  Why is this important? I’ll explain using the example of a cleaning services business. If the business is trying to portray their brand as being ‘professional’ and ‘clean’, then an employee who is wearing ‘dirty’ or ‘inappropriate’ clothing will confuse your audience.  Proper training of your employees will considerably help with any of these issues.

 

5. Be Consistent and Authentic

Lastly, but very importantly, make sure every communication you send out in regards to your company is consistent and in line with the brand you have created. A confusing brand will deter rather than attract your audience.

 

Conclusion

When starting a small business and starting a brand, branding is an essential part of creating a business. Follow the steps above to create a brand that envelops the essence of your company and reap the rewards that come along with it.

The Creative Ninja - Identity + Branding Ad

For help defining your small business identity and brand, contact The Ninja to get started–Together, we can build you the brand you want to attract the customers you want!

 

Honest Advertising Slogans - iTunes

5 Honest But Funny Advertising Slogans – Part 5

By | Advertising, Identity & Branding, Logos

Advertising Slogans – Part 5 in a Series of 8.

We all know when we see certain brands out there in the world that we all have different viewpoints or reactions to them. Some reactions are good, while some are bad; but these 5 graphic representations of 5 well known brands and their advertising slogans, are purely comical in nature — if not true as well.

Honest Advertising Slogans - Candy Crush Saga

Honest Advertising Slogans - Yellow Pages

Honest Advertising Slogans - Victoria's Secret

Honest Advertising Slogans - iTunes

Honest Advertising Slogans - Subway

Always be sure your brand and image are in line with your business. Consult with The Creative Ninja today to ensure you’re sending the right message to your target market! Contact The Ninja to get started!

The Creative Ninja - Identity + Branding Ad

Social Media Marketing Tips

10 Social Media Marketing Tips

By | Advertising, Marketing

Social Media Marketing Tips

As a small business owner, social media marketing can feel overwhelming. Twitter streams move so fast, in a blink your message can get lost. Becoming an ‘Instastar’ (a person whose Instagram becomes an overnight sensation with 100,000 + followers) is nearly impossible unless you have hours to spend honing the perfect photo and your audience is in their early 20s. So what are the best methods to utilize social media marketing?

 

1. Start with a plan!

It might sound obvious, but too often people put up a Facebook page or start tweeting without thinking about how these tactics can help their business. Doing social media well requires committing both dollars and people to the effort. (You’d be surprised what $20.00 to boost a Facebook post can do to increase eyeballs.) Nothing will turn off a customer more than old, outdated posts and skimpy content.

In fact, “going dark” for too long can cost you followers. But don’t feel pressured to post every day. It’s best to find a cadence that works for you and your audience and stick to it. Social media marketing is an investment and needs to be prioritized to get maximum benefit.

 

2. Define your target audience and choose a corresponding social media marketing platform.

If you’re trying to reach teens or tweens, then SnapChat might be the right way to go. If you’re trying to reach their mothers or fashionistas, then Pinterest would be a better choice. You can also tailor your social media marketing posting schedule to your audience.

Are most of your customers on the East Coast? Then schedule updates for the times they’ll check their feeds. Keep it simple to start by picking one platform and doing it well. You can always add more later as you gain experience.

 

3. The top three elements of a robust social media marketing plan are: content, content, and more content!

Keep your content fresh and current. Blogging is a great place to start. As a small business owner you are the expert in your category — don’t be afraid to share your insights, but do so in “customer friendly” language.

Remember, you don’t have to do it all yourself. To build up your content, feel free to repost or share other’s content. (The fancy social media marketing term for this is “curated content”). If you post or re-post someone else’s content and it’s relevant to your products or services, consider utilizing Snip.ly to layover a branded message for yourself to get your customer to your products (I have).

 

4. Social media isn’t just about the written word anymore.

Post pictures that demonstrate your product’s benefits. Video is even better — videos have twice the engagement as photos on Instagram.

You can shoot a simple video with your smartphone that shows your product in use. Consider using one of your customers in the video to build your brand’s credibility and then post it on YouTube or embed right it on your Facebook page and blog.

 

5. Don’t try to sell on social media platforms but instead aim for engagement.

Getting customers to like/share your content is really important (even if it is just your sister). Social media marketing is a way for your customers to get to know what you and your company value and are passionate about. Be authentic and put up share-worthy posts.

Get your customers to like you and they’ll be more receptive to buying from you down the road. Share content that paints your worldview and bring your fans along for the ride.

 

6. Be responsive to customer comments made on social media.

If a customer makes a comment (positive or negative) get back to them right away. Ensure they know you are listening and responsive.

Demonstrating empathy for your customer may not change their mind, but will win you kudos with other readers. Listening and responding to social media requires time and thoughtfulness — another reason to start slowly and build into more platforms over time.

 

7. Social media marketing is the journey, your website is the destination.

If your social media marketing does its job, your prospects will end up on your website to learn more or make a purchase. You’ll want to have a website up and running before you start your social media marketing activities, so you have a site to point to from your social media channels. It doesn’t have to be perfect out of the gate (consider hiring The Creative Ninja [me] to get yourself online).

 

8. Be authentic.

Make your social media marketing channels and website a reflection of you and your brand so they feel real and are easy for you to update regularly. Speak in your own voice, but be careful to match the tone of your content to your business. If you are selling a medical product, then your content should be factual and your tone scientific.

If you are selling a fitness product, then an energetic tone may be more appropriate. Whatever the case, always use your own customers on the site — both in visuals as well as testimonials.

 

9. Customer focus – it’s not about you, it’s about them!

Observe the language your customers use to talk about your field and engage with them on those terms. Use hashtags to join ongoing conversations on social media, and incorporate commonly used terms in your website to help customers find you through web searches.

A lot of customers type questions into their browsers (“how do I season my cast iron pan?”), so if you sell cookware you’ll want to use this kind of language on your site rather than more technical terms that might be familiar to you but not your prospects.

 

10. Don’t forget about mobile!

Most tweeters use Twitter on smartphones and tablets, and half a billion Facebook users only use the site on mobile devices. And of course, the biggest social media platform — Instagram — is a mobile-first experience.

That means that many of your social media followers will be opening your website on mobile, so it’s important to make sure it’s optimized to provide a great browsing and shopping experience.

The Creative Ninja - Marketing Ad

Honest Advertising Slogans - Instagram

5 Honest But Funny Advertising Slogans – Part 4

By | Advertising, Identity & Branding, Logos

Advertising Slogans – Part 4 in a Series of 8.

We all know when we see certain brands out there in the world that we all have different viewpoints or reactions to them. Some reactions are good, while some are bad; but these 5 graphic representations of 5 well known brands and their advertising slogans, are purely comical in nature — if not true as well.

Honest Advertising Slogans - Men's Health

Honest Advertising Slogans - Pepsi

Honest Advertising Slogans - Instagram

Honest Advertising Slogans - LinkedIn

Honest Advertising Slogans - Cosmopolitan

Always be sure your brand and image are in line with your business. Consult with The Creative Ninja today to ensure you’re sending the right message to your target market! Contact The Ninja to get started!

The Creative Ninja - Identity + Branding Ad

Logo Colour Wheel

How Logo Colour Sends Messaging About Your Brand

By | Identity & Branding, Logos

If you are building a company that depends on making people feel sexy and sophisticated, it’s probably going to confuse your consumers if your logo colour is bright green.

That’s because different colors are associated with different feelings. Green conveys organic growth, the earth, nature, or feelings of caring. Meanwhile, black communicates feelings of sophistication, authority or seduction. Not convinced? Consider the green logo colour for Starbucks or Greenpeace and the black logo colours of Chanel or Sony.

Logo colour isn’t the only design element that communicates with your customer about your brand. Font, spacing between letters and shape also tell your brand story in that instant when a first impression is formed.

Have a look at the infographic below, to get a sense of whether your logo colour, shape and spacing are conveying the right message.

The Psychology Behind Logo Colours

 

What Different Colours Mean

Logo Colour Wheel

Every colour, has implications for logo design. Businesses need to pick their logo colours carefully to enhance specific elements of the logo and bring nuance to your message with the use of shade and tone.

In general terms, bright and bold colours are attention-grabbing but can appear brash. Muted tones convey a more sophisticated image, but run the risk of being overlooked. More specifically, particular meanings are ascribed to different colours in society…

  • Red implies passion, energy, danger or aggression; warmth and heat. It has also been found to stimulate appetite, which explains why it is used in so many restaurants and food product logos. Choosing red for your logo can make it feel more dynamic.
  • Orange is often see as the colour of innovation and modern thinking. It also carries connotations of youth, fun, affordability and approachability.
  • Yellow requires cautious use as it has some negative connotations including its signifying of cowardice and its use in warning signs. However it is sunny, warm and friendly and is another colour that is believed to stimulate appetite.
  • Green is commonly used when a company wishes to emphasise their natural and ethical credentials, especially with such products as organic and vegetarian foods. Other meanings ascribed to it include growth and freshness, and it’s popular with financial products too.
  • Blue is one of the most widely used colours in corporate logos. It implies professionalism, serious mindedness, integrity, sincerity and calm. Blue is also associated with authority and success, and for this reason is popular with both financial institutions and government bodies. Purple speaks to us of royalty and luxury. It has long been associated with the church, implying wisdom and dignity, and throughout history it has been the colour of wealth and riches.
  • Black is a colour with a split personality. On the one hand it implies power and sophistication, but on the other hand it is associated with villainy and death. More mundanely, most logos will need a black and white version for use in media in which colour is not available – and there is currently a trend for bold monochrome logos and word marks.
  • White is generally associated with purity, cleanliness, simplicity and naiveté. In practical terms, a white logo will always need to stand in a coloured field to make it show up on a white background. Many companies will choose to have a coloured version and a white version of their logos; for example, the Coca-Cola word mark appears in white on its red tins and brown bottles but is used in red when needed on a white background.
  • Brown has masculine connotations and is often used for products associated with rural life and the outdoors.
  • Pink can be fun and flirty, but its feminine associations means it is often avoided for products not specifically targeted at women.

These associations are not rigid rules, of course, but they’re worth keeping in mind as you make your colour choices. Remember that the overall impact of your logo design will depend not on the colours themselves but upon how these interact with the shapes and text.

 

Single or multiple colours?

Logo Colour - ebay

Multiple colours are difficult to pull off, but can work.

To get the maximum impact of your chosen colour’s coded message, I normally stick with a single colour when creating a logo design. That said, there are some very successful multi-coloured logos – think of Google, Windows or eBay.

The implication of multiple colours is that these companies are offering a wide choice of products and services. The multiple colours used for the Olympic rings carry a message of diversity and inclusivity.

A newly emergent trend in logo design is the use of mosaic patterns and tessellation. These naturally require several colours, ranging from contrasting brights to multiple shades of a single colour.

 

Think globally

If your client is a global corporation, choose your logo colour with care. There are cultural differences in the way colours are interpreted. For example, red is considered lucky in China, while white is the colour of death and mourning in India. There’s a good round up of the cultural connotations of different colours here.

Finally, don’t put too much focus on colour choice. Consider that one in 12 of us suffer from colour blindness. Plus there’s always the likelihood that any logo you produce for a client will end up be reproduced in monochrome, or even in different colours, as they see fit. So make sure your logo colour choice reinforces and enhances the design of your logo – but doesn’t define it.

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Honest Advertising Slogans - Nike

5 Honest But Funny Advertising Slogans – Part 3

By | Advertising, Identity & Branding, Logos

Advertising Slogans – Part 3 in a Series of 8.

We all know when we see certain brands out there in the world that we all have different viewpoints or reactions to them. Some reactions are good, while some are bad; but these 5 graphic representations of 5 well known brands and their advertising slogans, are purely comical in nature — if not true as well.

Honest Advertising Slogans - Toyota

Honest Advertising Slogans - Nike

Honest Advertising Slogans - Adobe Acrobat

Honest Advertising Slogans - Lego

Honest Advertising Slogans - FedEx

 

Always be sure your brand and image are in line with your business. Consult with The Creative Ninja today to ensure you’re sending the right message to your target market! Contact The Ninja to get started!

The Creative Ninja - Identity + Branding Ad